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We Are Models | Craig

NAME:  Craig

AGE: 24

WHERE/HOW WERE YOU SCOUTED:

I was working in house as an art worker for a clothing brand. I was used on the odd occasion for fittings or when they wanted to test out certain looks and photograph them or to re-do product shots. When the models would come in for castings for look books and campaigns, I would look at them and think ‘I could do that.’ When my contract finished on my job, I decided to email some agencies and sort out a day to do some walk ins. The first agency I went to see took me on there and then and sent me straight out to castings.

 

 

 

How long have you been modeling? Full time or part time?

I have been modeling for about 3 years now, part time.

 

 

 What do you do apart from modeling?

I horse ride. I work for my showjumping trainer Rosie Moss part time and currently have two of my own horses that I compete. It’s a completely different world from the fashion industry, I love having the contrast between the horses and modeling.

First thing in the morning I can be found looking like a mess mucking the horses out and riding for a few hours, then later in the afternoon I’m all scrubbed up waiting in line at a casting. It does make life very hectic trying to get a good balance of the two and sometimes things do clash, but seeing the photos from a shoot, and seeing a progression in the horses you’re training makes all the long days and hard work trying to balance everything seem very worthwhile.

 

 

Is there a certain quality (physical or otherwise) that you think helped you become a model?

I think being thick skinned has helped – you have to be able to take criticism by the bucketload in this industry. Some clients will love you, but others will not. Being able to take it all with a pinch of salt is a key quality.

On the physical side I think my jaw line, lips and eyes are what seem to have helped me become a model.

 

Do you feel any pressure as a model?

There is always a pressure to do well when you’re being paid a large amount for a shoot. Also there is the pressure to book jobs so it is competitive – no model wants to be the model who isn’t booking jobs.

 

 

Are there any stereotypes or myths about being a model?

The first question people usually ask when they find out you’re a model is ‘do you have an eating disorder?’ People assume you starve yourself, when in reality all the models I know love food!

 

 

Do you have a particular diet or exercise regime?

I have a gym membership, but lack serious motivation with the gym. I make up for it by riding for at least two hours a day. Most days it’s a lot more, depending how many horses I have to ride. The general maintenance work that goes into looking after the horses keeps me in shape.

 

 

Do you think the ‘X Factor’ plays a part in becoming successful?

Yes, I think you need a certain type of ‘x factor’ as clients need to remember you, and you play a part in making what you are wearing appealing to the consumer. You need that something a little bit special to stand out from the crowd.

I also think to be successful you need a team of bookers behind you that 100% believe in you and your look and will push you, along side a lot of hard work and effort from yourself. It’s about a bit of luck and being in the right place at the right time.

 

 

 

*Pictures are courtesy of www.strikemodelmanagement.com

 

 

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